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Contraceptive Implant

COVID-19 Information

COVID regulations are changing, however physical distancing and face coverings are still required at health care settings across Scotland. This restricts the number of patients we can have in our clinics at any one time. In addition our staffing levels are being affected by COVID.  As restrictions for the service ease and staffing levels return to normal we hope to increase the number of implant appointments available. 

All of our implant appointments are available to book online this generally works well and suits most of our patients. We do acknowledge however that the number of appointments we have currently can outstrip the number of patients looking for an appointment.

This means that once we have added a clinic the appointments get booked up very quickly. Appointments are generally added on a weekly basis when we can see what our staffing levels are. This is to avoid patients booking appointments that then have to be cancelled as had been happening, which is very frustrating for patients and staff. We recommend checking as often as you are able to look for an available appointment.

 

It is important that you read the information on this page before attending.

What is the Contraceptive Implant?

The contraceptive implant is a thin rod that is inserted under the skin of your upper arm. It's inserted by a specially trained specialist. Once the implant is fitted, you do not have to think about it each day or each time you have sex.

The contraceptive implant is a very effective (5 in 10,000 failure rate) reversible method of contraception, which can last for 3 years.

The implant contains a hormone called progestogen, which is slowly realised into your body. This stops your ovary from releasing an egg (ovulating), thickens the cervical mucus and thins the womb lining. This makes it harder for sperm to move through your cervix, and less likely for your womb to accept a fertilised egg.

Contraceptive Implant

More information about the Implant, who can use it and how it works.

What happens at my appointment?

Please do not bring any other person with you to your appointment including children, partners, friends or family members. They will be asked to wait outside the building.

After checking in at reception, you will be called into the clinic by a doctor or nurse. They will talk to you about your options and check that the implant is a suitable method of contraception for you.

They will ask you about any illnesses or operations you or your family may have had. They will also discuss sexual health and cervical screening with you.

If suitable they will be able to fit your implant for you during the appointment. The appointment generally lasts for 30 minutes.

 

After care information for the Implant procedure

Please read the after-care information for the Implant procedure below.

There is no routine follow up; but to discuss issues or for any further information please contact Sandyford on 0141 211 8130 and ask to speak to a nurse.

 

 

  1. The sticky dressing you have keeping the skin edges together is called a steri-strip.
    Please keep sterile dressing and pressure bandage in place for 48hrs to prevent bacterial infection and to reduce bleeding and bruising.

  2. Remove the outer bandage and sterile dressing. 
  1. The steri-strip can be removed after 48hrs, gently by soaking off with water. Do not pull.

  2. Keep the area clean and dry and observe for any signs of local infection

    e.g.  Swelling,  red appearance,  green or foul smelling discharge from the area, increased pain, hardening of the wound area, heat around the wound or  fever

  3. If you experience signs of infection please consult your G.P. in the first instance.

  4. Once your wound has healed, check you can feel your implant. Contact Sandyford or your GP if unable to feel your implant.  

  5. Your contraceptive implant requires to be changed every 3 years.

FAQs for Implant

I've had my implant in for 3 years and it is now due for a change. Will it still protect me?
The risk of getting pregnant in the year after an implant expires (during the 4th year of use) is very low.  Even tho...

The risk of getting pregnant in the year after an implant expires (during the 4th year of use) is very low.  Even though this is the case, it cannot be guaranteed that your implant will still be fully effective, and therefore you may want to use condoms or another form of contraception, such as the contraceptive pill, as well.

Why is it recommended to have my implant changed after 3 years if it is still working?
Studies have shown that using the implant beyond 3 years is unlikely to lead to pregnancy.  However, at the moment th...

Studies have shown that using the implant beyond 3 years is unlikely to lead to pregnancy.  However, at the moment there are not enough women in these studies to say definitely that the implant works as well in the 4th year as in the first 3 years so additional protection is recommended. 

I have been advised to use other hormones for contraception while my implant/hormonal IUS is still there.  Will this harm me?
The amount of hormones in the body with either the implant is extremely small.  In addition, progestogen, which is th...

The amount of hormones in the body with either the implant is extremely small.  In addition, progestogen, which is the type of hormone used in the implant is a very safe hormone and one that almost every woman can use even if they have other health problems.  It will therefore not harm you to take other hormones as well.  When starting any new hormone however it is always important to check that it is safe for you to use.

I was advised to extend using my IUS/Implant. I wasn’t having periods before, and now they have come back.  Does this mean my implant or IUS has stopped working?
It is not uncommon for your bleeding pattern to gradually change towards the end of the lifespan of the device.  Lot...

It is not uncommon for your bleeding pattern to gradually change towards the end of the lifespan of the device. 

Lots of users have sporadic bleeding when using the implant, however if this is unusual for you and you are beyond your replacement date it is recommended to use additional contraception such as condoms or have a chat with your prescriber about adding hormonal contraception. Although in the first year after change date of implant it is highly unlikely you will get pregnant, it is not guaranteed. Organising additional contraception can usually be done remotely via your usual provider.

Extended use within guidelines makes the likelihood of pregnancy very low but there is still a risk, that’s why the a...

Extended use within guidelines makes the likelihood of pregnancy very low but there is still a risk, that’s why the advice is to either use condoms or if suitable another hormonal method until you can have your implant replaced. If you think you might be pregnant you should take a test 3 weeks after any risk and use condoms until you are sure.

 

If I get pregnant while using hormonal contraception, will the hormones harm the baby?
Many women who become pregnant whilst using hormonal contraception continue unknowingly to take hormones before the p...

Many women who become pregnant whilst using hormonal contraception continue unknowingly to take hormones before the pregnancy is identified.  There are no known adverse effects on the baby.

Manage your sexual health online

You can book appointments online with Sandyford for all contraceptive options including Implants. 

Please try to book an appointment online in the first instance. If you are having any issues with our online booking system, please phone 0141 211 8130.

What to expect at Sandyford

All the information you need about your visit to Sandyford. Before, during and after the appointment.