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COVID-19

If you believe you have Coronavirus (COVID-19), or have developed a continuous cough, have a fever/high temperature, loss of smell or taste, or have come into contact in the last 14 days with someone who has; then please do NOT come into Sandyford. For further information about Coronavirus please visit NHS Inform

 

 

 

 

NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde

Contraception after having a baby

There are many very effective and safe methods of contraception that are ideal for people who have just had a baby and want to space their pregnancies or have long term contraception. Your midwife will discuss contraception with you during one of your antenatal visits. Staff in the hospital, or community, will make sure you can get your chosen method easily and quickly, to allow you to start it as soon as you have your baby. The need for contraception returns again as soon as 3 weeks after your baby is born, so ideally starting the sooner the better is best. If you have had a form of intrauterine contraception after having a baby you need to have a check-up at around 4-6 weeks to make sure the coil threads can be seen, and to trim them if needed. There may be a slightly higher chance of the coil becoming expelled as your womb returns to its non-pregnant size. Most women will be aware if this happens.

There are a number of contraceptive options available when you are breastfeeding. These should not affect your baby or your breast milk. Breastfeeding is not a reliable method of contraception However, you are less likely to get pregnant if:

  • your baby is less than six months old
  • AND your periods have not come back
  • AND you are fully breastfeeding day and night with no bottle feeds at all.

If you have problems with breastfeeding or milk supply, you should contact the infant feeding centre in the hospital for advice.

Your contraception options after having a baby

If you did not get contraception before leaving hospital and you would now like to come to Sandyford to discuss your options please make an appointment online or call us. Please avoid unprotected sexual intercourse during this time.

Implant
The implant is a tiny rod, about the size of a bendy matchstick that is inserted under the skin of your upper arm. I...

The implant is a tiny rod, about the size of a bendy matchstick that is inserted under the skin of your upper arm.
It releases a hormone called progestogen that prevents your ovaries from releasing eggs and thickens your cervical mucus. This helps to block sperm from getting to the egg in the first place. It can be inserted as soon as you have your baby, before leaving the hospital.

 

Hormonal intrauterine contraception
A little, t-shaped device that is placed in your uterus (womb). It prevents pregnancy by keeping the lining of the wo...

A little, t-shaped device that is placed in your uterus (womb). It prevents pregnancy by keeping the lining of the womb thin, and often people have lighter or no periods. It can be fitted either in the first 48 hours after delivery or four weeks later. This will be discussed by your midwife or doctor antenatally and can be planned for the time of your delivery. It can also be inserted at the time of a planned caesarean section. Follow up is needed 4-6 weeks after the procedure to check the it is correctly placed.

 

Non-hormonal intrauterine contraception
A little, t-shaped device that is placed in your uterus (womb) and alters the way sperm move which prevents the sperm...

A little, t-shaped device that is placed in your uterus (womb) and alters the way sperm move which prevents the sperm from fertilising an egg. This type of contraception has a small amount of natural, safe copper. It’s 100% hormone free and keeps periods regular. It can be fitted either in the first 48 hours after delivery or four weeks later.
This will be discussed by your midwife or doctor antenatally and can be planned for the time of your delivery. It can also be inserted at the time of a planned caesarean section. Follow up is needed 4-6 weeks after the procedure to check the it is correctly placed.

 

Injection
The injection contains progestogen, a hormone that prevents your ovaries from releasing eggs. It also thickens your c...

The injection contains progestogen, a hormone that prevents your ovaries from releasing eggs. It also thickens your cervical mucus, which helps to block sperm from getting to the egg in the first place. It can be given as soon as you have had your baby, before you leave the hospital.

 

Combined hormonal contraception
Usually this is a pill that you take at the same time every day. There are lots of different kinds of pills on the ma...

Usually this is a pill that you take at the same time every day. There are lots of different kinds of pills on the market. There are also patches or vaginal rings which work just like the pill. These methods contain two hormones, oestrogen and progestogen, that prevent your ovaries from releasing an egg. If you are breast feeding you cannot use a combined hormonal contraceptive until 6 weeks after you have had your baby. If not breast feeding you may be able to start at 3 weeks post birth, but some women may need to wait until 6 weeks due to health reasons. You can use another method in the meantime.

 

Progestogen-only pill
This pill contains only one hormone, progestogen, which is taken every day. This method suits women who want to take ...

This pill contains only one hormone, progestogen, which is taken every day. This method suits women who want to take a pill but who cannot have oestrogen. The newer type of pill stops the ovaries from releasing an egg, as well as thickening cervical mucus. It can be started as soon as you have had your baby and is available from the postnatal ward.

 

Female sterilisation
This involves blocking the fallopian tubes so that sperm cannot get through to meet an egg. There are different ways ...

This involves blocking the fallopian tubes so that sperm cannot get through to meet an egg. There are different ways of doing this, which need to be done in hospital. If you are thinking about having female sterilisation you should speak to your doctor as soon as possible, so they can advise you about what your options are. It is important to remember that the intrauterine methods (hormonal and non hormonal "coils") and implant are more effective than female sterilisation.

 

Male sterilisation- Vasectomy
This involves blocking the tubes (vas deferens) that take sperm from the testicles to the penis. It is a quick proced...

This involves blocking the tubes (vas deferens) that take sperm from the testicles to the penis. It is a quick procedure done under local anaesthetic. To arrange this you can ask your GP for a referral to Sandyford Sexual Health Service or phone 0141 211 8654 for a pre vasectomy appointment. Male sterilisation is more effective than female sterilisation and a much simpler procedure. The intrauterine methods (hormonal and non hormonal "coils") and implant mentioned in this leaflet are also very effective, reversible method. You will normally be advised to wait until your youngest child is a year old before you have a vasectomy.

 

Emergency contraception
If you have unprotected sex in the first 3 weeks after having your baby, you will not need emergency contraception. I...

If you have unprotected sex in the first 3 weeks after having your baby, you will not need emergency contraception. If you have unprotected sex after the first 3 weeks without using contraception you can get pregnant. There are two main types of emergency contraception- the copper IUD (coil) and hormone pills.

 

What will happen at my intrauterine contraception check-up appointment?

It is a short appointment which can be done at a time that suits you and you can bring your baby with you if you wish.

  • We will phone or write to you with an appointment.
  • After checking in at reception, you will be called into the clinic by a doctor or nurse. They will perform a vaginal speculum examination (this is a plastic instrument which is inserted to see your cervix) to check the coil threads.
  • We are aware you may feel tender after having a baby. If you have a particular concern, please let us know.
  • If the threads cannot be seen, you will need an ultrasound scan to check that the coil is still inside the womb. 
  • If you need to come back for a scan appointment, you will be provided with alternative contraception.
  • You are welcome to breast feed at the clinic. If you wish a private space, please let any of the team know and we will help.
  • Most clinics have lift access. If you need any extra assistance, please let us know.
  • We will arrange an NHS interpreter if needed.
What will happen at the scan appointment?

This will be carried out at Sandyford Central.

  • You will have an ultrasound scan, which is often an internal vaginal scan. This gives us a clearer view of the womb and coil.
  • Occasionally we find that the coil has fallen out or moved position. There may be a slightly higher chance of this happening after having a baby as your womb returns to its non-pregnant size. Most women would be aware if this had happened.
  • If we think the coil has expelled, we may be able to fit another coil if needed.
  • As you may be having a procedure and some people may feel a little faint or unwell we ask that if you need to bring children with you that someone is able to look after them. We are unable to provide any childcare.

Manage your sexual health online

Book, cancel & reschedule contraception appointments online. 

What to expect at Sandyford

All the information you need about your visit to Sandyford. Before, during and after the appointment.